Formerly Sad Dog Gets Happiest Life

By Jamie Stillwachs, McDowell County Chapter Manager

A few weeks ago, a little white dog came to us from the McDowell County Animal Shelter. Her name is Gretchen, and she is a perfect but heartbreaking example of what shelters in our area see on a regular basis: overbred, malnourished, frightened and sad pitbull-type dogs with very dismal futures.

It was clear that Gretchen had birthed several litters of puppies in her life and had received very minimal care. She was covered in fleas, her ribs were protruding, and she had a look of complete hopelessness in her eyes.

Statistics show that only 1 out of every 600 pitbull-type dogs who enter the U.S. shelter system make it out alive. In many shelters around the country, Gretchen would have quickly become one of those statistics.

Fortunately, McDowell County has built a compassionate support system of animal welfare professionals and advocates. Because of the hard work of people in our community, dogs like Gretchen are getting a second chance that they never would have had just a few years ago.

When we met Gretchen, the shelter she was in had reached maximum capacity. We put out a call for help, and our community stepped up. First, a donor offered to sponsor her, giving us the resources to act fast. Next, a foster named Ramona offered to take Gretchen into her home.

When we arrived at the shelter, Ramona was already there, holding a leash with Gretchen on the other end. Gretchen was safe, soon to be on her way to her new foster home — and possibly the first indoor home she had ever known.

The first few days in her foster home were challenging. Ramona quickly learned that Gretchen does not like being left alone outside in the yard for any period of time, so she now spends her days lounging in an air-conditioned bedroom, following Ramona around the house, eating nutritious food, receiving kisses, and learning what it’s like to be a member of the family. She has the sweetest soul and is a great reminder of why we do what we do.

With your support, we will help more animals like Gretchen get their second chances. If you’re able, please use the button below to make a donation to our McDowell County chapter. It will take all of us working together to help make McDowell County a true No Kill community!

The McDowell County chapter of Brother Wolf Animal Rescue helps build the resources and programs necessary to create a No-Kill McDowell County. We collaborate with the county shelter and our community to identify animals most at risk and work to save their lives through our adoption, foster, volunteer, outreach, and pet retention programs.

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